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Section21.5References and Suggested Readings

[1]
  
Dean, R. A. Elements of Abstract Algebra. Wiley, New York, 1966.
[2]
  
Dudley, U. A Budget of Trisections. Springer-Verlag, New York, 1987. An interesting and entertaining account of how not to trisect an angle.
[3]
  
Fraleigh, J. B. A First Course in Abstract Algebra. 7th ed. Pearson, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2003.
[4]
  
Kaplansky, I. Fields and Rings, 2nd ed. University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1972.
[5]
  
Klein, F. Famous Problems of Elementary Geometry. Chelsea, New York, 1955.
[6]
  
Martin, G. Geometric Constructions. Springer, New York, 1998.
[7]
  
H. Pollard and H. G. Diamond. Theory of Algebraic Numbers, Dover, Mineola, NY, 2010.
[8]
  
Walker, E. A. Introduction to Abstract Algebra. Random House, New York, 1987. This work contains a proof showing that every field has an algebraic closure.